Menu

Managing Feinting by the Kicker at a Penalty Kick or Kick From the Mark

0 Comments


In response to requests for clarification of its earlier guideline on deception at the taking of a penalty kick, the International Football Association Board (IFAB) published a circular in 2010 outlining the circumstances in which a player taking a penalty kick may act to deceive the goalkeeper by performing a “feint” between the time the referee signals for the kick to be taken and when the ball is considered to be “in play.” This memo provides those clarifications in summary form, followed by several points of emphasis to assist referees in managing the process.

A. On a penalty kick, if the kicker performs an illegal deception after the referee has blown the whistle for the kick to be taken and before the ball is in play:

 

OUTCOME OF THE PENALTY KICK
GOAL NO GOAL PUNISHMENT
KICK IS RETAKEN1 INDIRECT FREE KICK FROM THE PLACE WHERE THE INFRINGEMENT OCCURRED CAUTION2

1Another teammate of the original kicker may take the kick if a retake is ordered.

2If this is a second caution, the kicker is sent off and shown the red card.

NOTE: If a player from the defending team also violates Law 14, the penalty kick is retaken regardless of the outcome.

B. On a kick from the penalty mark (as part of a tie-breaking procedure), if the kicker performs an illegal deception after the referee has blown the whistle for the kick to be taken and before the ball is in play:

 

OUTCOME OF THE KICK FROM THE MARK
GOAL NO GOAL PUNISHMENT
KICK IS RETAKEN1 KICK IS COMPLETE: NO RETAKE2 CAUTION3

1Another teammate of the original kicker may take the kick if a retake is ordered. However, a replacement kicker must still meet the requirement of the rules governing “Kicks from the Penalty Mark” that no eligible player can kick an additional time until all eligible players have kicked. If no teammate is available who meets this requirement, the original kicker must kick the retake.

2The kicker is, however, credited with having taken the kick and may not kick again until all other eligible teammates have kicked the same number of times.

3 If this is a second caution, the kicker is sent off and shown the red card (the opposing team does not “reduce to equate”).

Referees are reminded that they must still monitor other actions by the kicker which might also violate Law 14 (or the kicks from the mark procedure). For example, the kicker must not take such a long, convoluted run to the ball that, in the opinion of the referee, this action delays the restart of play; the kicker must not run past the ball and then back up before kicking; and the kicker must not make a hand or arm gesture which, in the opinion of the referee distracts or deceives the goalkeeper.

The term “illegal deception” used above with respect to penalty kicks or kicks from the mark refers to the action of the kicker described in USSF’s “Memorandum 2010”:
This would include clearly stopping and waiting for a reaction by the goalkeeper before taking the kick or any similar clear hesitation after the run to the ball is complete and before kicking the ball into play. In other words, once the kicker has reached the ball, the kick must be taken without hesitation or delay.